ENSO model verification via Fourier analysis infill

Because the ENSO model generates precise temporal harmonics via a non-linear solution to Laplace’s Tidal Equations, it may in practice be trivially easy to verify. By only using higher-frequency harmonics (T<1.25y) during spectral training (with a small window of low-frequency signal to stabilize the solution, T>11y), the model essentially fills in the missing bulk of the signal frequency spectrum, 1.25y < T < 11y.  This is shown below in Figure 1.

Fig. 1: Bottom panel of amplitude ENSO SOI spectra shows the training windows.  A primarily low-amplitude spectral signal is used to fit the model (using least-squares on the error signal). Upper spectra shows the expanded view of the out-of-band fit. This rich spectra is all due to the non-linear harmonic solution of the ENSO Laplace’s Tidal Equation solution.

This agreement is statistically unlikely (nee impossible) to occur unless the out-of-band signal had knowledge of the fundamental harmonics (i.e. the highest amplitude terms in the meat of the spectra) that are contributing to the higher harmonics.

Figure 2 is the underlying temporal fit. Although not as good a fit as what we can achieve using more of the primary Fourier terms, it is still striking.

Fig. 2: Temporal model fit using only Fourier frequency terms shorter than 1.25 years and longer than 11 years. The correlation coefficient is 0.7 here

The consensus claim is that ENSO is a chaotic process with no long-term coherence. Yet, this shows excellent agreement with a forced lunisolar model showing very long-term coherence.   An issue to raise is: why has the obvious deterministic forcing model been abandoned as a plausible physical mechanism so long ago?

4 thoughts on “ENSO model verification via Fourier analysis infill

  1. A full model fit to shortest component 0.4y.

    The residual of the fit across the entire spectrum (Nyquist T = 1/6 y) appears to be flat white noise

    No use trying to improve the fit beyond this point —

    “Bottom line: when the residuals fail to be white noise, a different model should be tried. Short answer regarding time series regression: If they are not white noise (i.e. they are not normal, not have zero mean or serially autocorrelated), then your model is not fully adequate. Therefore, you should revise your model.”

    Like

  2. Pingback: Unified ENSO Proxy | context/Earth

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